CHAOS OF THE THIRD MIND

The Third Mind of Katelan Foisy & Vanessa Sinclair

Events

VANESSA SINCLAIR, “THE CUT IN CREATION”

MARYLAND INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART (MICA)

WEDNESDAY MARCH 22: Main Building 110, 7-8pm

The Bookstore in the Grove

Monday, February 27, 2017 @ 6-8PM

Reading by Vanessa Sinclair accompanied by Carl Abrahamsson.

Rönnells Antikvariat

Wednesday, January 4, 2017 @ 6:30-9PM

Performance by Vanessa Sinclair accompanied by the haunting vocals of Den Arkaiska Rösten. Listen to full audio of performance here.

Bokhandeln Aniara

Tuesday, January 3, 2017 @7-10PM.

VANESSA SINCLAIR: SWITCHING MIRRORS BOOK RELEASE

Monday, November 28, 2016 @8PM

Trapart Books are proud to present the release of SWITCHING MIRRORS by Vanessa Sinclair.

SWITCHING MIRRORS is an amazing collection of cut-ups and mind-expanding poetry by Vanessa Sinclair. Delving into the unconscious and actively utilising the “third mind” as developed by William S Burroughs and Brion Gysin, Sinclair roams through suggestive vistas of magic, witchcraft, dreams, psychoanalysis, sex and sexuality (and more). Causal apprehensions are disrupted by a flow of impressions that open up the mind of the reader. What’s behind language and our use of it? What happens when random factors and the unconscious are given free reign in poetic form? Switching Mirrors is what happens.

Come by the beautiful Delancey rooftop bar and buy a signed copy of this remarkable book. Vanessa will read selected poems to live music performed by Liza Beth Paap. Audio of event performance available here on soundcloud.

The limited, deluxe edition (23 copies) with a signed print of one of Vanessa’s collages will also be available.

Vanessa Sinclair, PsyD, is a psychoanalyst and clinical psychologist in private practice in New York City. She is a founding member of Das Unbehagen: A Free Association for Psychoanalysis (www.dasunbehagen.org), which facilitates psychoanalytic lectures, classes, and events in and around New York City. Together with artist Katelan Foisy, she explores the magic and artistic expression of the cut-up method and the third mind (please visit their web site www.chaosofthethirdmind.com). She contributes to a variety of publications, including the The Fenris Wolf, DIVISION/Review: A Quarterly Psychoanalytic Forum, ERIS Magazine, and The Brooklyn Rail.

If you can’t make it to this magical evening, please consider buying the book straight from Trapart: https://store.trapart.net/home/112-switching-mirrors.html

img_0719Illustration by Don Punchatz for Playboy Magazine, October 1969

On the Dance of Occult and Unconscious in Freud

Thursday, October 6, 2016, 7-9pm

On the Dance of Occult and Unconscious in Freud: An Illustrated Lecture with Dr. Steven Reisner and Vanessa Sinclair

Join renowned psychoanalyst Dr. Steven Reisner in an exploration of the early occult writings of Dr. Sigmund Freud with Psychoanalysis, Art & the Occult series curator Dr. Vanessa Sinclair, as she responds to Dr. Reisner’s presentation and joins him in a discussion.

In 1953, psychoanalyst and anthropologist George Devereux published a collection of works from various psychoanalysts entitled Psychoanalysis and the Occult, which explored the intersection between the practice of psychoanalysis and occult phenomena, including contributions from Freud himself on ‘Premonitions and Chance’, ‘Psychoanalysis and Telepathy’, and ‘The Occult Significance of Dreams’.  Additionally, Freud’s paper ‘Notes on the Unconscious’ was published in the journal of the Society for Psychical Research in 1912.  Since that time, however,  the majority of psychoanalysts willing to traverse occult terrain have worked within a Jungian framework, as the topic itself was central to the split between Freud and Jung, with the former insisting the burgeoning field of psychoanalysis become  scientific and not spiritualist. However, Freud maintained an interest in occult phenomena longer than many of his followers would like to believe, and it’s time to explore this aspect of his work further.

 

Stripped to the Core on the Road to Madness – Journey of the Shaman, Artist, Magical Practitioner – An illustrated lecture with Charlotte Rodgers and Khi Armand

September 14, 2016 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Stripped to the Core on the Road to Madness – Journey of the Shaman, Artist, Magical Practitioner – An illustrated lecture with Charlotte Rodgers and Khi Armand

In 1913, Swiss psychologist and physician Carl Gustav Jung embarked on what his biographers have termed an imaginative journey populated by a wide host of characters engaging him in a nocturnal work that would result in, among other things, the recently released tome The Red Book: Liber Novus. Calling it his most difficult experiment, some have found parallels between Jung’s harrowing pilgrimage through the unconscious and the crises experienced by medicine people within indigenous cultural contexts.

 

The Thing That Knowledge Can’t Eat: Engaging the Power of Archetypes and Deities for Radical Transformation/ Exploring the Seven Souls with Langston Kahn and Demetrius Lacroix

July 12, 2016 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Thing That Knowledge Can’t Eat: Engaging the Power of Archetypes and Deities for Radical Transformation/ Exploring the Seven Souls with Langston Kahn and Demetrius Lacroix

 

The Dagara, an indigenous culture in West Africa have a phrase, Yielbongura, roughly translated as “the thing which knowledge can’t eat”, the ecstatic and mysterious experience of the numinous that can’t be grasped completely by the mind. In indigenous cultures around the world, engagement with these forces is seen as integral to basic health. While in the west, the importance of myth, symbol and archetype in the psychological healing process have become part of popular consciousness, in large part due to the work of Freud and Jung, the lens of scientific materialism often reduces these complex forces to constructs of the mind, castrating their cosmic potentialities.

In a lecture to some of his students Jung stated, “You cannot get conscious of these unconscious facts without giving yourself to them. If you can overcome your fear of the unconscious and can let yourself go down, then these facts take on a life of their own. You can be gripped by these ideas so much that you really go mad, or nearly so. These images form part of the ancient mysteries; in fact, it is such fantasies that made the mysteries.”

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 Salvador Dalí, Metamorphosis of Narcissus, 1937

Double, Double, Toil and Trouble; Narcissism, Mourning & Sexuality: Freud and Lacan meet Dalí and Goldin, An Illustrating Lecture with Claire-Madeline Culkin and Ray O Neill

May 27, 2016 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Double, Double, Toil and Trouble; Narcissism, Mourning & Sexuality: Freud and Lacan meet Dalí and Goldin, An Illustrating Lecture with Claire-Madeline Culkin and Ray O Neill

Tonight, join Dr. Ray O Neill – writer, psychoanalyst, and witty Irishman – for a lecture illustrating how Freud, Dalí and Lacans theories on psychoanalysis, surrealism, and representation, all mediate the narcissistic double which Freud defines as the uncanny harbinger of death, contrasted with an illustrated lecture by Claire-Madeline Culkin on mourning and sexuality via a psychoanalytic lens on the work of Nan Goldin. Freuds 1922 paper, Some Neurotic Mechanisms in Jealousy, Paranoia, and Homosexuality moved psychoanalytic discourse beyond narcissism as the bedrock for homo-sexual desires, arguing paranoia as another cause. This was the first paper of Freuds Lacan officially translated in 1932 utilising Freuds theories for his doctoral research, investigated homo-doublings and homo-sexuality within paranoid structures, delusions and manifestations.

Just as Freud universalised homosexual unconscious wishes, so Lacan normalises paranoid delusions, not as false meanings but personal ones, psychical functions of representation. Both Freud and Lacan would attract the attention of Dalí precisely because of these theorisations on paranoia, narcissism, ideal-egos, with not a little sublimated homosexuality being informed. Dalís Metamorphosis of Narcissus illustrates these psychoanalytic queries, motivated consciously and unconsciously by Dalís own personal questions, paranoia and sexuality which converged around his own actual double, the original Other Salvador Dalí, his dead older brother.

Claire-Madeline Culkin will present an essay titled Beds Bodies, and Other Books of Common Prayer in which she explores the work of mourning in sexuality through a close analysis of the photographs of famed photographer Nan Goldin. Known for her unapologetically honest portraiture, Goldins The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, and the subject of this essay, provides a lens into a personal moment the destruction of a destructive relationship set in the context of a cultural moment the height of both the gay-rights movement and the AIDS epidemic that centered on the convergence of sexuality and loss. Using psychoanalytic theory to discuss the structures in these photographs, and the narratives they frame, Claire-Madeline explores the constituting function of loss in the organization of human relationships and the human psyche.

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Psychoanalysis, Art & the Occult

May 6-8, 2016

Candid Arts Trust, London

In 1953, psychoanalyst and anthropologist George Devereux published a collection of works from various psychoanalysts entitled Psychoanalysis and the Occult, which explored the intersection between the practice of psychoanalysis and occult phenomena, including contributions from Freud himself on ‘Premonitions and Chance’, ‘Psychoanalysis and Telepathy’, and ‘The Occult Significance of Dreams’. Additionally, Freud’s paper ‘Notes on the Unconscious’ was published in the journal of the Society for Psychical Research in 1912. Since that time, however, the majority of psychoanalysts willing to traverse occult terrain have worked within a Jungian framework, as the topic itself was central to the split between Freud and Jung, with the former insisting the burgeoning field of psychoanalysis be scientific and not spiritualist. However, Freud maintained an interest in occult phenomena longer than many of his followers would like to believe, and the time has come to explore this aspect of his work further.

Until now, the intersection of psychoanalysis and the occult has perhaps been most richly explored through the arts. Most well known are the Surrealists, who espoused Freud’s theories, and who were fascinated by the unconscious, dreams, synchronicity, automatic writing and chance encounters. These themes and methods are also featured in the work of the Symbolists, Futurists, Dadaists, Fluxists and Actionists, as well as in the work of avant-garde artists of our day.

The purpose of this conference is to bring together a diverse group of psychoanalysts, occultists and artists to share their views on human subjectivity and culture. Through an investigation of the unique modes and methodologies utilized by each individual practitioner, we may explore human experience via the convergence of domains that rarely speak to one another yet often work in similar and complementary ways.

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Image Within/ Image Without: Iconography, Symbols, and the Psychology Reflected Therein – A Discussion of Historical and Modern Divinatory Practices with Dr. Al Cummins and Jesse Hathaway Diaz

April 18, 2016 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Image Within/ Image Without: Iconography, Symbols, and the Psychology Reflected Therein – A Discussion of Historical and Modern Divinatory Practices with Dr. Al Cummins and Jesse Hathaway Diaz

For the third installment of the series Psychoanalysis, Art & the Occult, we welcome Dr. Alexander Cummins and Jesse Hathaway Diaz, as they speak from varying albeit intersecting positions about image magic, iconography, divination, the passions and the psychology reflected therein.

The end of the early modern period marked the beginning of the modern notion of the emotions, as distinct from pre-modern notions of the passions. Against this background, many occult philosophers and magical practitioners from various socio-economic strata sought to map, manage, and manipulate states of and proclivities towards such passional affectivities, for both medical and sorcerous goals. One means was through image magic. Such images ranged from icons for contemplation to astrological-magical sigils (a term much later popularized via Austin Osman Spare by modern Chaos magicians) cast at elected times to store and radiate astral influence.

These images utilized occult principles of cosmological organization (in the use of ontological astrological categories such as the 4 elements, 7 planets, 12 Zodiacal signs and 36 decans) as well as principles of operation such as reflection, similitude, signature, and sympathy. They also represent a series of fascinating and historically fruitful micro-studies into the deeper epistemological turn of the early modern period involving shifting comprehensions of vision, doubt, phantasy and the imagination as demonstrated in tracing developments of faculty psychology, Christian cabala, and wider occult philosophy of affect and emotionology, which Cummins will explore.

Where these classifications come most into play in many other traditions is in the unique purvey of the Diviner. The need to understand and create metrics describing the tendencies of behavior and personality is far more pervasive than the more widely accepted vocabulary of modern Western psychoanalysis. While the immediate benefit of these revelations are best contextualized within their culture’s pervading cosmovision, a survey of how this translates as practical information outside of a given culture or system of belief is possible. Hathaway Diaz examines this interplay between Diviner and Divined within traditions such as Cuban Santeria and Ifá, Brazilian Quimbanda, and Meso-American Indigenous Astrology, drawing upon experience as a diviner and initiate. First examining the root impulse and principle drive, often deemed an independent being or spiritual source in sympathy with the person being read, the manifestation of this impulse is guided through an active wrestling with many forces, and certain patterns become identifiable and possible outcomes examined in foresight. Some forces are considered permanent, others passing, but all reveal a complex insight into the makeup of the complex of souls in these different traditions, often providing a resolution and advice in manifesting the more positive side of these seeds of action. Here on the Diviner’s mat, in the Calendar keeper’s analysis: demons are consulted, gods go to war, and we manifest destiny through prescription and proscription.

 

Death is in our Hearts: Meditations on Death’s Attractional Force, an Illustrated Lecture with Carl Abrahamsson

February 5, 2016 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Death is in our Hearts: Meditations on Death’s Attractional Force, an Illustrated Lecture with Carl Abrahamsson

Mr. Abrahamsson will discuss the process which led him to this discovery, involving exploration of his photo archives and finding themes he hadn’t consciously pursued, especially emblems, symbols, remnants, cemeteries, and mementoes related to death and dying. In 2010, he assembled some of these images for an exhibition called “Death is in our Hearts, ” on view at Martin Bryder Gallery in Lund, Sweden. The process provided many insights not only into his own psyche but also into the meaning of death in general. The final and absolute power of death made itself known through his own artistic endeavors, and he found himself forever grateful.

 

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A CUT IN CREATION

Saturday, January 16, 2016 @ 7:00pm – 8:00pm

Madame ZuZu’s Teahouse – 582 Roger Williams Ave, Highland Park, Illinois 60035

A Cut in Creation (Chicago) 

Dr Vanessa Sinclair and artist Katelan Foisy will present their ongoing research into the implications of the cut-up method of Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs, specifically when integrated with theory and practice of chaos magic, witchcraft, art, and psychoanalysis. Foisy and Sinclair are currently working on a book paying tribute to Burroughs and Gysin’s seminal work The Third Mind. Through a series of experimentations, some taken directly from TheThird Mind while others inspired by it, the pair explore the spaces that can be created when systems are broken down. By calling upon the work of artists who highlight the importance of the cut in their own work, the pair examine the essential nature of the cut in creation.

They will discuss their work, personal experience and areas of research interest, opening up a dialogue between practitioners in fields of study that rarely have a chance to engage with one another yet often operate in similar and complementary ways. This talk is the first in a series curated by Dr. Vanessa Sinclair for Morbid Anatomy Museum in NYC. Sinclair and Foisy are bringing it to Chicago for one evening only.

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The Cut in Creation: An Introduction to Psychoanalysis, Art and the Occult

January 11, 2016 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm

The Cut in Creation: An Introduction to Psychoanalysis, Art and the Occult with Dr. Vanessa Sinclair

This is the inaugural event of a series exploring the intersection, integration and application of psychoanalytic theory, the arts, and the occult, curated by psychoanalyst, Dr. Vanessa Sinclair. Throughout the series, Sinclair will be hosting a variety of psychoanalysts, psychologists, artists and occultists from a range of backgrounds and theoretical orientations. Presenters will discuss their work, personal experience and areas of research interest, opening up a dialogue between practitioners in fields of study that rarely have a chance to engage with one another yet often operate in similar and complementary ways.

In this first discussion, Sinclair and artist Katelan Foisy will present their ongoing research into the implications of the cut-up method of Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs, specifically when integrated with theory and practice of chaos magic, witchcraft and psychoanalysis. Foisy and Sinclair are currently working on a book paying tribute to Burroughs and Gysin’s seminal work The Third Mind. Through a series of experimentations, some taken directly from The Third Mind while others inspired by it, the pair explore the spaces that can be created when systems are broken down. By calling upon the work of artists who highlight the importance of the cut in their own work, the pair examine the essential nature of the cut in creation.

Katelan Foisy is a multimedia artist, writer and witch. Her fine art pieces have been displayed at The Worcester Art Museum, Ohio History Museum, MODA, WEAM, A&D Gallery, and Last Rights. She has graced the pages of the Grammy Award programs and the stage of Cynthia von Buhler’s immersive plays “Speakeasy Dollhouse” and “Brother’s Booth.” Katelan has been featured in NY Times, Elle Magazine, Paper Magazine, GQ Italy, Time Out NY and many others for her work both as an artist and curator. She has written for Motherboard/VICE, Electric Literature, Luna Luna, and COILHOUSE. She was called a “Female Jack Kerouac” by Taylor Mead.

Vanessa Sinclair, Psy.D. is a psychoanalyst and clinical psychologist in private practice in New York City. She is a founding member of Das Unbehagen: A Free Association for Psychoanalysis, which facilitates psychoanalytic lectures, classes and events in and around New York City. She contributes to various publications including The Fenris Wolf (Edda Publishing), DIVISION/Review: A Quarterly Psychoanalytic Forum, and the Brooklyn Rail.